7

Picture Prompt

Posted by Claudia Moser on 10:42 AM in , , , ,

Beth provided us, GBE 2 Group Members, with a picture prompt, which automatically triggered in my the association of this older gentlemen with a happy monk, which reached his inner peace. His eyes are so soft and yet playful, is smile is honest and warming. 

Mircea Eliade wrote the following 'The joy of life is not a profane type of enjoyment: it reveals the bliss of existing, of sharing in the spontaneity of life and the majesty of the world.' and in my eyes this is the quintessence of this picture. 

I find Eliade's words very inspiring, his books are not easy to read, but his approach to the history of religion is worth your time. Some of his ideas below:


'In love, no certainty is ultimate... That elementary thing - the feeling that you are loved - must be certified again and again, because one doubt,one mistake razes everything to madness and ecstasy.'


'It is preferable to love a genius than to love the masterpieces of a mediocre soul.'


'Nothing lasts within the heart. Even the most certified conviction can be annulled by a single gesture.'


'Memories are the icons of time lost.'


'Light does not come from light, but from darkness.'

Quite fascinating right?





|

7 Comments


What a beautiful face!


Zufriedenheit ist ein hohes Gut, doch heutzutage leider weitgehend unbekannt...

Lieben herbstlichen Gruß und Fröhlichkeit!

Cloudy


He reminds me of a real life santa


Beautiful piece.


Fascinating!

Kathy
http://gigglingtruckerswife.blogspot.com


Love it. Love your heart.


@Jacqueline - I agree
@Cloudy - du hast Recht, nicht jeder kann zufrieden sein!
@Adam - many from the group thought just that
@Kat - thank you
@Kathy - indeed
@Jo - you are so kind, thank you

Post a Comment

Thank you for your comments, I appreciate them all!

Motto

"A story is not like a road to follow … it's more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you."
by Alice Munro

Copyright © 2009 The story All rights reserved. Theme by Laptop Geek. | Bloggerized by FalconHive.